Remembrances
1:58 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Sound Pioneer Ray Dolby Dies At 80

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Ray Dolby, whose inventions revolutionized the way audiences listen to entertainment, has died. He was 80 years old.

NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports the sound pioneer - whose name became synonymous with sound - died at home in San Francisco.

MANDALIT DEL BARCO, BYLINE: Thank Ray Dolby for inventing the system that surrounds you with sound at the movie theater and in your headphones.

(SOUNDBITE OF VARIOUS DOLBY SOUNDS)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Whispering) Surround you.

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Politics
1:58 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Without Action, Government Will Shut Down At Month's End

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the future shape of the economy will be influenced, in part, by negotiations in Congress this month. What could possibly go wrong? If Congress doesn't act by the end of this month, there will be a partial government shutdown and then in October a fight over the debt ceiling looms. Some Republicans want to rerun a tactic they used in 2011, refusing to borrow to pay for commitments Congress previously made unless the White House agrees to Republican budget demands. NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith has the latest.

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Science
12:07 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Living Gears Help This Bug Jump

An image from an electron microscope of the back legs of a planthopper insect.
Gregory Sutton

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 10:21 am

Greg Sutton was closely inspecting the back legs of a planthopper nymph — a small green, flightless insect — when he noticed something odd.

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Environment
12:06 am
Fri September 13, 2013

'Rivers On Rolaids': How Acid Rain Is Changing Waterways

Gwynns Falls runs beneath Interstate 95 at Carroll Park in Baltimore. The chemistry of this river, like many across the country, is changing.
Courtesy of Sujay Kaushal

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 7:47 am

Something peculiar is happening to rivers and streams in large parts of the United States — the water's chemistry is changing. Scientists have found dozens of waterways that are becoming more alkaline. Alkaline is the opposite of acidic — think baking soda or Rolaids.

Research published in the current issue of Environmental Science and Technology shows this trend to be surprisingly widespread, with possibly harmful consequences.

What's especially odd about the finding is its cause: It seems that acid rain actually has been causing waterways to grow more alkaline.

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The Salt
12:05 am
Fri September 13, 2013

The Secret To Making It Through A Yom Kippur Fast? Kreplach

Kreplach, a special Jewish holiday dish that can be made essentially out of leftovers.
Courtesy of Caren Alpert

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 9:11 am

To mark the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, the day of atonement, Jews fast from sundown to sundown. But before the sun sets, friends and family gather to enjoy one final meal. And for the Jews of Eastern Europe, that meal traditionally includes kreplach.

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Shots - Health News
12:03 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Treating Kids' Cancer With Science And A Pocket Full Of Hope

Dr. Jim Olson meets with Carver Faull at Seattle Children's Hospital in August. Carver, now 12, had surgery to remove a brain tumor in 2012.
Matthew Ryan Williams for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 7:02 am

Try to imagine someone who is supremely calm while at the same time bursting with energy, and you've got a pretty good idea of what Jim Olson is like.

He's a cancer researcher, physician, cyclist, kayaker and cook, not always in that order. He approaches each activity with incredible passion.

But to really understand Olson, you have to watch him in action with patients.

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StoryCorps
12:02 am
Fri September 13, 2013

How One Man Continues To 'Just Pass It On'

Thomas Weller, 65, says he's been called an angel more times than he can count.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 4:44 am

Thomas Weller would have died in a snow bank in 1964 had a stranger not helped him. Weller, 65, has been helping strangers in the same way ever since.

"I've been called the Lone Ranger. And I've been called an angel more times than I can count," he says. "But, I'm no angel! When you help somebody else, you help yourself. And, it's ... real gratifying."

Click on the audio link above to hear Weller's story.

Audio produced for Morning Edition by Jasmyn Belcher.

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The Record
9:23 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

'90s Nostalgia Revisited: 6 Musicians We Miss

P.M. Dawn, sometime in the '90s.
Mick Hutson Redferns

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:11 am

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The U.S. Response To Syria
3:30 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Frenemies Forever: Why Putin And Obama Can't Get Along

Russia's President Vladimir Putin welcomes President Obama at the start of the G-20 summit on Sept. 5 in St. Petersburg. Russia.
Eric Feferburg AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 4:09 pm

Leaders who respect each other and have a good relationship don't mock each other.

Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin do not have a good relationship.

Just as Russia and the U.S. are attempting to work out a delicate deal to rid Syria of chemical weapons, the Russian president published an op-ed in The New York Times thumbing his nose at President Obama.

Reactions to the affront have been strong.

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Space
3:16 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

See Ya, Voyager: Probe Has Finally Entered Interstellar Space

This artist's illustration shows the Voyager 1 space probe. The spacecraft was launched on Sept. 5, 1977, and as of August 2012, it is outside the bubble of hot gas, known as the "heliopause," that radiates from the sun.
NASA/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 6:34 pm

NASA's two Voyager spacecraft, launched in 1977, have made history in a dramatic fashion by exploring the outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Now one of the vehicles, Voyager I, has made another pioneering leap. It is the first spacecraft to leave the vast bubble of hot gas that surrounds our solar system.

At long last, Voyager 1 is now in interstellar space.

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