Africa
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

What Lies Ahead For Egypt

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

To talk more about the changes in Egypt, we turn to Michele Dunne. She's director of the Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East at the Atlantic Council, a think tank here in Washington. Welcome to the program.

DR. MICHELE DUNNE: Thanks, Audie.

CORNISH: So let's go back to the interim president, Adly Mansour. He was the supreme justice of Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court. Tell us more about him and some of his ties to previous regimes.

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Africa
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Zimbabwe Braces For Upcoming Elections

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:59 pm

After years of food shortages and drought, in a country that was once the breadbasket of southern Africa, Zimbabwe's crippled economy is recovering — after adopting the U.S. dollar as its currency. But memories of the violent elections in 2008 are fueling fears about security. The disputed vote ended in a power-sharing deal between President Robert Mugabe and his main opposition rival. The Zimbabwean leader has now proclaimed July 31 as election day.

The Salt
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

How The DIY Butter Trend Got Churning

Emma Dodd and Claire Quinn, churn butter at Claude Moore Colonial Farm.
Photo Courtesy Claude Moore Colonial Farm

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:38 am

Artisanal food fever is raging, and the latest sign is the rise in sales of old-fashioned butter churns.

Purveyor Glenda Lehman Ervin of Lehman's sells old-timey kitchen gadgets online and at her family's store in Kidron, Ohio. She says the clientele is quite diverse. "There are lots of people interested," she says.

It's not just homesteaders, hipsters and do-it-yourself-minded foodies getting in on the hands-on pursuit.

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Around the Nation
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

New Housing Project In Philadelphia Aims To Attract Teachers

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

Time spent among people who do the same kind of work can boost morale, sharpen creativity, just go to a conference or a retreat. So some people involved in education thought how about giving teachers a place where are a lot of them can live under one roof. They're trying that in Philadelphia.

Here's Elizabeth Fiedler of member station WHYY.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

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Shots - Health News
12:37 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

A Busy ER Doctor Slows Down To Help Patients Cope With Adversity

Smith talks with Dawn Dillard, 57, about a medical procedure at Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage. Dillard has uterine cancer.
Annie Feidt APRN

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:51 am

Dr. Linda Smith walks into a room at Providence Alaska Medical Center, ready with a stethoscope and a huge grin. She teases her patient, Dawn Dillard, saying that her spiky hair recently resembled a "faux hawk."

Dillard found out she had uterine cancer a year ago. Her oncologist gave her a year to live. The 57-year-old has beaten those odds, but now her kidneys are failing. After the laughs are over, Smith sits down on the edge of Dillard's bed, leans in, and starts talking about a procedure Dillard will have.

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Shots - Health News
12:03 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Gut Bacteria We Pick Up As Kids Stick With Us For Decades

Streptococcus bacteria, like this strain, can be found in our guts.
Janice Haney Carr CDC Public Health Image Library

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:06 am

Most of the microbes in our guts appear to remain stable for years, perhaps even most of our lives, researchers reported Thursday.

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NPR Story
11:54 am
Thu July 4, 2013

The Rowing Team That Stunned the World

This photo from the 1936 Olympic Games shows the University of Washington eight-oar boat (top) crossing the finish line just ahead of second-place Italy and third-place Germany. (University of Washington Libraries, Special Collection)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 3:02 pm

In 1936, a rowing team from the University of Washington stunned the world by winning a gold medal in eight-oar crew at the Berlin Olympics in front of a crowd that included Adolph Hitler and Joseph Goebbels.

The sons of American loggers, farmers and shipyard workers defeated elite European teams, grabbing the attention of millions of Americans and transforming the sport.

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NPR Story
11:54 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Is Your DNA Private? It Might Not Be

Vickie Chaplin loads patient samples into a machine for testing at Myriad Genetics Friday, May 31, 2002, in Salt Lake City. (Douglas C. Pizac/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 3:02 pm

Would you want your girlfriend’s parents to be able to test your DNA to find out your ancestry? What if the grad school you were applying to wanted to test for tendencies for mental illness?

Within a few years, the cost of DNA sequencing may be just a few hundred dollars. When it gets that cheap, it will be easy for anyone to get a test.

But should there be legal restrictions on it? And is there a way to keep our DNA private?

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NPR Story
11:54 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Fourth Of July: When The Piccolo Gets To Shine

Jim Walker plays the piccolo. (www.jimwalkerflute.com)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 1:47 pm

Fourth of July means we’ll be hearing a lot of John Philip Sousa’s famous military march “Stars and Stripes Forever.”

The big highlight comes toward the end, when the piccolos in the orchestra stand and let loose over the rest of the orchestra.

But imagine being the piccolo player who has to play that part over and over.

“The first time I played it was in the seventh grade,” Jim Walker, the retired principal flutist and piccolo player for the Los Angeles Philharmonic told Here & Now.

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Meningitis Vaccination Effort Aimed At Gay Men

Allen Smith, 21, from West Hollywood, Calif., gets a free vaccine against bacterial meningitis at the AIDS Healthcare Foundation in West Hollywood, Calif., Monday, April 15, 2013. (Damian Dovarganes/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 3:02 pm

There have been 22 cases in the past three years of a deadly new strain of meningitis that has spread in New York’s gay, bisexual and MSM (men who have sex with men) communities.

Seven of the men who contracted the illness died.

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