Parallels
10:58 am
Thu July 11, 2013

If Egypt's Political Crisis Looks Bad, Check Out The Economy

Egyptian drivers wait in long lines outside a gas station in Cairo on June 26. Along with a stuttering economy, traffic-clogging street protests and a crime wave, fuel shortages have come to symbolize the disorder of the post-Mubarak Egypt.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:00 pm

The spotlight on Egypt has focused on the the political fallout from the military coup that toppled an elected but deeply unpopular government. But if you think Egypt's politics are a mess, just consider the economy.

Tourism, a major revenue generator, has been hurting since the Arab uprisings of 2011 that toppled Hosni Mubarak. Foreign investment has shriveled. Unemployment in many industries has soared. Inflation has risen, making everyday goods more expensive. And there's a black market in currency and fuel.

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Bernanke's Comments Lift Stocks To Record Highs

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:29 pm

Stocks surged Thursday after the chief of the Federal Reserve sent signals that the central bank wasn't in a hurry to stop helping the economy. When the markets closed, the Standard & Poor's 500 Index was at a record high. Other U.S. indexes were also up, including the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which rose nearly 170 points to a record 15,460.92.

Update at 5 p.m. ET: We've updated some figures in this post to reflect the markets' closing.

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NPR Story
10:50 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Beyond AC/DC -- New Music Out Of Australia

Travis Holcombe is a DJ at KCRW. (KCRW)

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 7:30 am

KCRW, the public radio station in Santa Monica, California, is well known for setting tastes in music and discovering unknown talent.

Travis Holcombe, who DJs there, has been hearing a lot of interesting music out of Australia — from the group Jagwar Ma to Tame Impala.

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Shots - Health News
10:45 am
Thu July 11, 2013

After FDA Approval, Drugmakers Often Miss Study Mark

Even after drugs have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, the safety studies continue.
iStockphoto.com

The prescription drugs you take spend plenty of time on the drawing board before they end up in your medicine cabinet. But the research work doesn't necessarily stop then.

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The Two-Way
10:41 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Why We Aren't Assuming Snowden Is On That Jet To Havana

The more northerly route that Aeroflot 150 normally takes.
FlightAware.com

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 12:57 pm

Twitter has been abuzz with speculation that "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden is on Aeroflot Flight 150, which is headed to Havana from Moscow as we write.

What's the supposed evidence?

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NPR Story
10:40 am
Thu July 11, 2013

New Jersey Takes Up Same-Sex Marriage Fight

Advocates for gay marriage in New Jersey gather outside the Statehouse in Trenton, N.J., June 27, 2013. (Mel Evans/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:44 pm

New Jersey is the center of the next battle for gay marriage. The state is one of seven that offers same-sex couples civil unions or domestic partnerships.

Buoyed by the U.S. Supreme Court ruling striking down key provisions of the Defense of Marriage act, advocates will argue that the current law denies couples equal protection under the law.

Meanwhile, Democrats in the Garden State legislature are pushing for an override of Governor Christie’s veto of gay marriage legislation last year.

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NPR Story
10:35 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Happy 85th Birthday, Sliced Bread

(SliceOfChic/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:44 pm

Sliced bread turns 85 years old this month. The Chillicothe Baking Company sold the first wrapped package of sliced bread in history on July 7, 1928.

So what can sliced bread teach us about business?

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NPR Story
9:50 am
Thu July 11, 2013

John Singer Sargent And The Painting That Made His Reputation

"The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit" by John Singer Sargent, American, 1882. (Museum of Fine Arts Boston)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:44 pm

John Singer Sargent painted “The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit” more than 130 years ago, but his depiction of four little girls in white pinafores is still a favorite attraction at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston.

Erica Hirshler, senior curator at the MFA says the youngest daughter holds a particular pull.

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NPR Story
9:45 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Rookie Player Stirs Uproar In MLB All-Star Voting

Los Angeles Dodgers' Yasiel Puig during warmups to play against the Philadelphia Phillies in a baseball game Thursday, June 27, 2013, in Los Angeles. (Alex Gallardo/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:44 pm

Yasiel Puig, a rookie baseball player for the Los Angeles Dodgers, has generated buzz and controversy as fans vote for the last players to be named to the MLB All-Star teams. The game is next Tuesday.

Puig, 22-year-old Cuban defector, has only played in the major leagues for a little over a month and has impressed people with his stats and athleticism.

However, some people think his short tenure with the Dodgers makes him undeserving of being an All-Star. The only way he can make the All-Star team is if baseball fans vote him in, and voting ends today at 4 p.m.

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NPR Story
9:40 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Tampa Courts Cuba For Future Business

A street in Trinidad, Cuba. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:44 pm

Miami may be closer to Cuba and home to more people of Cuban ancestry, but Tampa is ready to capitalize on economic and diplomatic ties to to the island nation once the longstanding trade embargo is lifted.

Tampa business owners are talking about how to expand into Cuba, and politicians are making trips there.

“In Tampa, they supported the revolution that freed Cuba from Spain. They supported the Castro revolution. They consider themselves a lifeline to Cuba,” Eric Barton of the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting told Here & Now.

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