The Two-Way
1:44 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Inmates Across California Join Hunger Strike Over Conditions

A watchtower rises above the maximum security complex at Pelican Bay State Prison near Crescent City, Calif.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 1:52 pm

Thousands of prisoners across the state are expressing solidarity with inmates being held in solitary confinement at Pelican Bay State Prison in Northern California. They began refusing meals on Monday.

Problem inmates at the Pelican Bay maximum security facility are held in the Security Housing Unit. Some inmates have been in the SHU, pronounced "shoe," for decades.

Advocates for the inmates have filed a federal lawsuit to end the protracted use of solitary confinement.

Read more
All Tech Considered
12:03 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Tech-Savvy Cities May Be 'Smart,' But Are They Wise?

Cable cars move commuters over a complex of shantytowns in Rio de Janeiro, one of many cities taking part in the smart city boom around the world.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 1:52 pm

This summer, NPR's Cities Project has been looking at how cities around the world are solving problems using new technologies. And though there's great promise in many of these "smart" city programs, New York University's Anthony Townsend remains skeptical.

Townsend, whose book Smart Cities is due out in October, tells NPR's David Greene about the causes, benefits and potential dangers of the smart city boom.


Interview Highlights

On what caused the smart city boom

Read more
Environment
12:01 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Saving One Species At The Expense Of Another

Antelopes stand at alert at the presence of a human visitor in the sparsely populated Centennial Valley of Montana.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 1:52 pm

To keep America's wilderness anything like it used to be when the country was truly wild takes the help of biologists. They have to balance the needs of wildlife with those of cattle-ranching and tourism, and even weigh the value of one species against another. Ultimately, they have to pick and choose who makes it onto the ark. And, as scientists in Montana's Centennial Valley have discovered, all that choosing can be tricky.

Read more
Fine Art
11:59 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

At 90, Ellsworth Kelly Brings Joy With Colorful Canvases

In this 2007 Ellsworth Kelly piece, four separate oil-painted canvases combine to form a single work, Green Blue Black Red.
Jerry L. Thompson Courtesy of Ellsworth Kelly

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 1:52 pm

American artist Ellsworth Kelly turned 90 in May, and there's been much celebration. On Wednesday, President Obama presented Kelly with the National Medal of Arts. Meanwhile, museums around the country are showing his work: Kelly sculptures, prints and paintings are on view in New York, Philadelphia and Detroit. In Washington, D.C., the Phillips Collection is featuring his flat geometric canvases, layered to create wall sculptures.

Read more
Music News
11:58 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Robin Thicke, Beyond His Breakout Hit

YouTube

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 7:29 am

Read more
NPR Story
10:15 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Egypt Escalates Crackdown On Muslim Brotherhood

Supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, seen in poster, protest in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, July 9, 2013. (Nasser Shiyoukhi/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:50 am

Prosecutors in Egypt have ordered the arrest of the head of the Muslim Brotherhood, along with nine other leaders.

Egypt’s interim government has insisted that the Muslim Brotherhood incited violence on Monday morning when soldiers and police opened fire and killed over 50 civilians.

The civilians were holding a sit-in in front of a military headquarters where deposed president Mohammed Morsi is believed to be held by the Army, calling for Morsi’s release and reinstatement.

Read more
NPR Story
10:14 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

90 Cents: The Cost Of Safely-Made Jeans In Bangladesh

A Bangladeshi woman works in a textile factory on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2005. (Manish Swarup/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:50 am

Bangladesh is the world’s second largest exporter of garments, after China and the industry is crucial to its economy.

Bloomberg News reporter Mehul Srivastava went to Dhaka to see what factory conditions are like and find out what it would cost to improve those conditions.

Read more
Government & Politics
6:39 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Deal Speeds Athletes Workers' Comp Bill Through Capitol Committee

Assemblymember Henry T. Perea (D-Fresno) introduced the bill (file photo)
Credit The Californian / Reporting on Health Collaborative

A workers’ compensation bill that’s provoked a high-stakes lobbying fight between professional sports teams and players unions has passed a key hurdle in the California legislature.

The bill would prevent out-of-state athletes from filing claims in California’s workers’ comp system.  Under a deal reached to move the measure forward, athletes who spend part of their career in the state would be eligible only if they play a certain amount of time for California teams. 

Read more
Government & Politics
6:31 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

California Senate Leader Questions Future of Water Bond

California Senate Leader Darrell Steinberg (file photo)
Credit Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

California Senate Leader Darrell Steinberg says he’s not sure a long-delayed $11 billion water bond will make it on the 2014 ballot. More than $2 billion of that money is slated to be spent on the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta. 

Governor Jerry Brown is backing a plan that calls for constructing two large underground tunnels that would send water from the Delta to Central and Southern California.

Read more
World
4:46 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

50 People Believed Dead In Quebec Train Explosion

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Canadian police say they found five more bodies in the rubble of the small village in Quebec devastated by a train explosion on Saturday. That brings the confirmed death toll to 20. And officials say the 30 people still missing are now presumed dead. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann is on the scene. He joins us now on the line.

Read more

Pages