NPR Story
5:49 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Food Stamp Advocates Outraged Over Farm Bill

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 12:45 pm

Republicans have passed a farm bill through the House of Representatives that strips any provisions for food stamps or food banks, in an effort to win conservative votes.

This is the first time the food stamp program has not been included on the farm bill since 1973.

What does this mean for low-income people who depend on food stamps and food banks?

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Movie Reviews
5:48 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

A New Day, A Last Day, For One Man At 'Fruitvale Station'

Michael B. Jordan plays Oscar Grant, an Oakland man with a checkered past and a new determination to get his life right — until one terrible night at Fruitvale Station.
The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:19 pm

Fruitvale Station, on the Oakland side of the San Francisco Bay: Grainy cellphone video from a day, four years ago, that commanded the nation's attention. Several young black men sit on a transit station platform, white transit police officers standing over them. There's shouting, scuffling, but nothing that looks worrisome.

Then what sounds like a shot.

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Government & Politics
5:28 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Napolitano Tapped to Head UC System

Janet Napolitano has been tapped to head the UC system. Supporters say she she’s the right person to help redefine higher education.
Credit Janet Napolitano / DHS

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano is being tapped to serve as the next president of the University of California. As Katie Orr reports from Sacramento, so far reaction to the announcement has been largely positive.

President Barack Obama, Governor Jerry Brown and numerous other politicians and colleagues have voiced their support for the choice. Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, a UC Board of Regents member, says UC needs to find a new way to operate. And he says Napolitano is the right person for what could be a tough job.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:08 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Limericks

Carl reads three news-related limericks: Duck-billed humans, a Twisted Tribute, and Toddler Toupees.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:08 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:08 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Prediction

Now that we're no longer the fattest country in the world, our panelists predict what the U.S. will do to regain our No. 1 status.

The Salt
3:57 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Micro-Garden Madness: You Showed Us Your Stuff

Tomatoes and herbs grow in barrels in this urban micro-garden.
Nico Sanchez via Flickr/Creative Commons

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 7:30 am

Earlier this week, we told you about some of the people who are trying to make micro-gardening go big — by sharing their DIY tips and selling products designed to make gardening in a small space a piece of cake. Many readers of The Salt let us know they were all for it.

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The Two-Way
3:55 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

San Francisco Hospital Reports Third Death In Asiana Crash

A third death has been reported in the crash-landing of Asiana Airline flight 214, as San Francisco General Hospital said Friday that one of its patients who was injured in the accident has died. Hospital officials described the victim as a girl; they offered no further details about her.

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Movie Interviews
3:26 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Guillermo Del Toro, On Monsters And Meaning

A child of the '60s and '70s, Guadalajara-born director Guillermo del Toro has been a fan of the Japanese kaiju film tradition since he was a kid. His latest movie, Pacific Rim, is his passion project and homage to the genre.
Rafy Warner Bros. Pictures

From the audience-pleasing Hellboy to the critically acclaimed Pan's Labyrinth, Guillermo del Toro's movies are chock-full of mystical, often terrifying creatures. Now the Mexico-born director has made a big-budget entry in the genre that helped define his fascination with the monstrous: the Japanese kaiju films of the '60s.

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Irina Zhorov is a reporter for Wyoming Public Radio. She earned her BA from the University of Pennsylvania and an MFA from the University of Wyoming. In between, she worked as a photographer and writer for Philadelphia-area and national publications. Her professional interests revolve around environmental and energy reporting and she's reported on mining issues from Wyoming, Mexico, and Bolivia. She's been supported by the Dick and Lynn Cheney Grant for International Study, the Eleanor K. Kambouris Grant, and the Social Justice Research Center Research Grant for her work on Bolivian mining and Uzbek alpinism. Her work has appeared on Voice of America, National Native News, and in Indian Country Today, among other publications. 

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