Around the Nation
2:12 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

On Capitol Hill, A Statue And A Rock God Bring Politicians Together

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 3:00 pm

Meanwhile on Capitol Hill, an unlikely scene unfolded as a bust of Winston Churchill was unveiled in Statuary Hall Wednesday. The entertainment: Roger Daltrey. Who? Yes, Roger Daltrey of the 1960s rock band The Who.

Television
2:12 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Medicinal Laughs: Could 'Daily Show' Sour Millennials On ACA?

Jon Stewart, shown here interviewing President Obama on The Daily Show in October 2012, has been lampooning the problems with the Affordable Care Act website in recent episodes.
Brad Barket PictureGroup

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 3:00 pm

Problems with the rollout of the Affordable Care Act have been all over the news — and the not-quite news. Comedy Central's The Daily Show With Jon Stewart has been one news-ish outlet that hasn't been too kind in its coverage.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans spoke with All Things Considered host Audie Cornish about why negative coverage on The Daily Show might be worse for the Obama administration than negative coverage on the nightly news.

Read more
Parallels
2:12 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Ottoman Dream Come True: Train Links East And West In Istanbul

A Marmaray Project train awaits its inauguration ceremony in Istanbul on Tuesday.
Ozan Kose AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:04 pm

The Marmaray Project, Turkey's new underwater rail link between the European and Asian sides of Istanbul, is open for business. It's the first of its kind, a modern feat of engineering that realizes the 150-year-old dream of an Ottoman sultan.

Read more
Politics
2:12 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Texas' Voter ID Law Creates A Problem For Some Women

Marta Rangel Medel vacuums the stage in preparation for the Texas Democratic Party 2012 election watch party in Austin. The state's controversial voter ID law is unexpectedly hindering women at the polls.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 6:03 pm

In 2012 a federal court struck down Texas' ID law, ruling it would potentially disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of minority voters.

But that federal decision was invalidated when the Supreme Court last year ruled part of the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional. So now Texas is test-driving its voter ID law — one of the most restrictive voter ID laws in the nation.

Read more
U.S.
2:12 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Police, Community Relations Strained After Teen's Death

Hundreds of protesters march toward the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office in response to the death of Andy Lopez in Santa Rosa.
Noah Berger Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 6:43 am

Sonoma County, Calif., is probably best known for its good wine, green sensibilities and otherwise healthy and peaceful living. But that peace was shattered last week when a county sheriff's deputy shot and killed a young teenager carrying a toy gun.

Read more
NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Obama-Era Stock Market Gains Surpass Reagan Era

A view from the Member's Gallery inside the New York Stock Exchange in August 2008. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 2:29 pm

President Obama has passed Ronald Reagan and is gaining on Bill Clinton, when it comes to how far the stock market has climbed during his time in office.

Under Obama, the S & P 500 has has jumped 120 percent. That beats Reagan’s 118 percent and is closing in on Bill Clinton’s 210 percent.

Is it fair to compare these presidents? And how much down the president have to do with the stock market, anyway?

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson asks Roben Farzad of Bloomberg Businessweek.

Read more
NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Company Aims To Go Beyond Credit Cards

Credit card companies charge businesses 2 to 4 percent of each purchase with a credit card. (tom.arthur/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 2:29 pm

Businesses frustrated by the fees they pay to credit card companies are looking at a European Union proposal that would reduce the swipe fees merchants have to pay every time a customer pays with a card.

The EU proposal calls for a cap on the swipe fees of 0.3 percent of the amount charged to a card — far lower than the 2 to 4 percent typically charged now.

Read more
NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Resident Chef Kathy Gunst Takes Stock Of Soup

Clockwise from top: Kathy Gunst's Roasted Fall Vegetable Soup, Winter Parsley Pesto, Greek-Style Turkey-Lemon-Rice Soup ("Avgolemono"), store-bought chicken stock and homemade chicken stock. (Rachel Rohr/Here & Now)

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 3:02 pm

As the weather turns cooler, Here & Now Resident Chef Kathy Gunst’s thoughts turn to nice warming soups.

And as she tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson, making a simple soup base or stock is easy and a great way to get rid of leftovers.

“Everything that’s in the vegetable bin that looks like ‘uh,oh, if we don’t use it tonight we’re in trouble’ kind of feeling? Throw it into the pot, boil it up, make a soup.”

Read more
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
1:08 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

In Sandy's Wake, Flood Zones And Insurance Rates Re-Examined

An emergency responder helps evacuate two people with a boat after their neighborhood in Little Ferry, N.J., was flooded.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 3:00 pm

When Sandy blew into East Coast communities a year ago, it was flooding that did the most damage.

That's in part because the average sea level has risen over the past century — about a foot along the mid-Atlantic coast. That made it easier for the storm to push the ocean onto the land.

And scientists say there will be many more Sandy-style storms — that is, torrential rain and wind that create heavy coastal flooding — and they'll be more frequent than in the past. But preparing people for that means changing the way they live, and that's proving politically difficult.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:52 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Priceless Italian Treasure Is Shown Off In Rare Exhibition

A necklace of Saint Januarius, in gold, silver and precious stones, is displayed in Rome. The riches are from a treasure trove in Naples that is said to be worth more than the British crown jewels.
Gabriel Buoys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 2:07 pm

Dazzling with diamonds, emeralds and gold, 70 pieces of treasure — said to be some of the most valuable in the world — have been transported from a vault in a Naples cathedral to a museum in Rome. They'll stay there until February, marking the first time they've ever been displayed outside of Naples.

Read more

Pages