The Two-Way
2:57 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Air Force Nuclear Unit Fails Inspection

The 341st Missile Wing at the Malmstrom Airforce Base in Montana handles one-third of the United States' land-based nuclear missiles.

Today, it failed an inspection after making "tactical-level errors during one of several exercises," the Air Force's Global Strike Command said in a statement.

The AP reports this is the second setback in a year for the unit. The news service adds:

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:44 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Hacking Real Things Becomes Child's Play At This Camp

Owen Chilcoat hacking his tablet. "I am just messing around ... trying to break it," he says.
Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 5:56 am

At r00tz, a camp that takes place each year during the Def Con convention in Las Vegas, children learn to pick locks, hack smart TVs and, most important, how to take apart and understand the technology that surrounds them.

The scene inside the camp a couple weeks ago was a bit of a madhouse — controlled chaos. Little kids everywhere. Brendan Herman was trying to program a machine to draw pictures on ping-pong balls, wearing a tinfoil hat.

"To protect me from aliens," he said.

Read more
Business
2:28 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

DOJ Suit Seen Delaying, Not Killing Big Airline Merger

A United Airlines jet takes off behind a US Airways jet at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport on Tuesday.
Win McNamee Getty Images

The government's decision Tuesday to oppose the merger of US Airways and American Airlines stunned airline analysts, but many predicted the deal eventually will win go through.

"Given that other airline mergers were approved, this was a surprise," University of Richmond transportation economist George Hoffer said. Other major carriers already have been allowed to combine forces, so "it's illogical to oppose this merger. This move comes a day late and a dollar short," he said.

Read more
Environment
2:24 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Bill to Increase Air Pollution Fines Moves Forward

file photo
Credit Valley Public Radio

A bill that would increase fines for big air polluters in California is now headed to the Assembly floor. As Amy Quinton reports from Sacramento, it was drafted in response to the Chevron oil refinery fire in Richmond last year.

The Chevron oil refinery fire forced 15,000 people to seek medical help. Under current law such a violation would result in a $10,000 fine. Democratic Senator Loni Hancock says the legislation she’s authored would increase the fine to $100,000.

Read more
Health
2:02 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

California Supreme Court Rules in School Insulin Case

The California Supreme Court Building in Sacramento (file photo)
Credit Flickr user Steve Rhodes - Creative Commons / http://www.flickr.com/photos/ari/

The California Supreme Court has ruled that school employees without medical licenses can give insulin shots to diabetic students in some cases.

Monday’s unanimous ruling reverses a lower court decision that permitted only licensed nurses to give the shots.

Dr. Francisco Prieto is with the American Diabetes Association. He says the ruling is necessary to keep students at understaffed schools safe.

“Most schools do not have a full time nurse present all day long and kids with diabetes need care,” says Prieto.

Read more

Dave DeWitt is currently working on the year-long North Carolina Teacher Project. He came to WUNC in 2003 and spent four years on the staff of The State of Things.

Middle East
1:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Sinai Peninsula Sees Increasing Violence Since Morsi Takeover

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:22 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In 2011, when demonstrators took to the streets of Cairo in peaceful protest against then-President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians in the Sinai Peninsula staged attacks on police stations. And while Cairo is still the scene of political conflict, in the Sinai, the conflict remains extremely violent.

Read more
Law
1:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Brand New N.C. Voter ID Law Already Facing Challenges

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:31 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Voting rights advocates are focusing their sights on North Carolina. The ACLU and the NAACP filed lawsuits challenging the state's new voting rules just minutes after Governor Pat McCrory signed the bill into law yesterday.

Dave DeWitt of North Carolina Public Radio reports the new law does more than merely require voters to show an ID at the polls.

Read more
Health Care
1:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Obama Delays Implementing Another Part Of Affordable Care Act

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:31 pm

The Obama administration has delayed implementation of another part of Affordable Care Act — this time, it's the rules aimed at limiting out-of-pocket costs for patients.

U.S.
1:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Red Cross For Rover: Inside America's Canine Blood Banks

At Blue Ridge Veterinary Blood Bank in Purcellville, Va., dog holder Diane Garcia snuggles with one-year-old Doberman Leon as phlebotomist Rebecca Pearce taps his jugular vein to start the blood draw. Leon's "mom," Carrie Smalser, feeds him peanut butter, to keep him happily distracted and calm.
Christopher Connelly NPR

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:55 pm

America is facing a blood shortage — a shortage of dog blood. Whether Fido tangles with a car and loses, or Barky contracts a blood-damaging disease, dogs — like their people — sometimes need transfusions. And while there's no centralized Red Cross for Rover, there are a few commercial canine blood banks across the country, and many veterinary schools do their own blood banking.

Read more

Pages