News

Fresno Police Department

Fresno Police have arrested the organizer of a Black Lives Matter protest that shut down a major street in Fresno and Clovis on Saturday. Authorities say 20 year-old Clovis resident Justice Medina was cited for blocking streets without a permit. Police say Medina directed several hundred marchers to block traffic on Shaw Avenue. The protest began at Blackstone and Shaw in Fresno and continued east into Clovis. 

Corporation for Better Housing

Farmworkers in Kern County could soon have another option for housing. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports on the USDA’s effort to give the people who pick the nation's produce better homes.

 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Fresno Police have released body camera footage  from the shooting death of the unarmed teen Dylan Noble from late June. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.

 

One of the two videos starts off with the officers pulling over 19-year-old Dylan Noble at a traffic stop. After the teen gets out of his truck he ignores the officer's demands to remove his hands from behind his back.

Michael J Semas

Michael J. Semas has an interesting perspective into valley history thanks to his collection of thousands of rare postcards, many more than 100 years old. Real photo postcards captured everyday life in Central California, and in many cases, they may be the only images remaining of certain communities, people or buildings. 

Alicia Griffin/Kris Robinson / Flickr

Farmers markets are full of bright colored produce at this time of year. Think sweet stone fruit, tart berries and tomatoes of every color. People love tasty heirloom tomatoes but they can be hard to grow and they’re expensive. That’s why researchers want to create a stronger plant. They’re doing this using a new twist on an old technique.

Scott Stoddard is an expert when it comes to tomatoes. He plants rows and rows of the fresh-market crop on farms across Merced and Madera counties for the UC Cooperative Extension. 

Henry R. Perea - Facebook

Northeast Fresno's water problem - corroded residential pipes that have resulted in rusty water that in some cases contains lead - isn't just an issue for the residents involved, it's now the latest issue in the 2016 mayor's race. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition KVPR Reporter Jeffrey Hess explores whether building a medical school in the Valley is the answer to the region's doctor shortage. We also hear from Fresno County Supervisor Henry Perea about water problems in North Fresno and more. FM89's Ezra David Romero reports a story about how simple science could help the tomato industry. Later we hear from the organizer of the Black Lives Matter protest in Fresno earlier this month.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

The USDA is hoping to encourage more African Americans to take up careers in agriculture. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports from an outreach event held today in Fresno.

The small USDA office in West Fresno was packed with more than 40 African American people ready to learn how to make their farming dreams a reality. The event is part of the USDA’s efforts to attract minorities and young people into farming professions.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

Have you ever called your doctor or hospital seeking an appointment and been told the wait will be weeks or maybe months? You have been affected by the Central Valley’s doctor shortage.

Now more than one group is pushing a potential solution, locally sourced doctors from a new medical school.

Being in a waiting room at the doctor’s office isn’t the most pleasant place to be.

But waiting to get into that waiting room can be even worse.

That is what health care experts call a ‘doctor shortage’ and in the valley it’s bad.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/USDA Forest Service

New data from NASA is helping forest managers deal with millions of dead trees in the Sierra. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports the mapping project is already yielding results.

Since 2013 NASA has flown a plane over the Sierra Nevada collecting images to map changes in the landscape. Zachary Tane with the Forest Service developed an algorithm to break down those measurements and layered the data into a map detailing the exact concentration of dead trees.

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