News

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

After years of clean-up efforts and some notable progress, air in the San Joaquin Valley is still among the worst in the nation. Now there’s a new goal for cleaning up particulate pollution  from things that create dust and exhaust. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports the effort has reached a new phase thanks to intervention from the state.  

Kerry Klein / KVPR

As communities across the southwest struggle to prevent valley fever, a sometimes-debilitating fungal disease, one community appears to have made progress: California state prisons, where inmates are at a significantly lower risk of valley fever than they used to be. Here, we explore why—starting with one man who wasn’t so lucky.

Richard Nuwintore was barely three weeks into his sentence at Taft Correctional Institution when he began to cough and experience chest pain. Within a few days, it was obvious something was wrong.

2016 Holiday Specials

Dec 19, 2016

Wednesday December 21 – 10:00 AM
The Rose Ensemble Live in Concert: Christmas in Baroque Malta

Serna family

A group of residents in Kern County is calling for an external investigation of the most recent deadly police-involved shooting in Bakersfield.

Just before 1 am Monday, Bakersfield police responded to reports of a man with a gun hassling people.

They found 73-year old Francisco Serna walking near his home. According to police, an officer shot Serna because he was approaching them with his hands in his pockets and did not follow commands.

Ian Oliver / Lindsay Unified School District

As we approach 2017, smartphones and Wi-Fi networks may seem practically universal. But even now, there remains a digital divide—and many San Joaquin Valley residents find themselves on the side without internet access. A new community effort, though, is bridging that divide, in what may seem an unlikely place.

Nikolaus Namba is a school district administrator in the town of Lindsay. He used to be a teacher—the Grinch on his tie is a dead giveaway.

“I’m still living in a land of being a child at heart,” he laughs.

Ezra David Romero

We all like to find ways to focus on leading healthy lifestyles. We search out healthy foods, join the gym, and want to breathe clean air. But what about health of the soil that grows our food? As FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports, some valley farmers are turning to cleaning soil in an effort to use less water and to help clean air.

Fifteen years ago tractors could be heard at Sano Farms near Firebaugh on any given day. Now the sound of tractors is rare.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

Fresno Unified Superintendent Michael Hanson is explaining in more detail why he has decided to end his tenure next year. A defiant Hanson says he is not caving to public pressure for his ouster.

Hanson has been superintendent for 12 years and during that time has helped solidify the district’s budget and improved educational results.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Following November's election, congressional representatives from the San Joaquin Valley are becoming increasingly influential in Washington. From House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy's efforts to pass a bill that aims to divert more water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and deliver it to valley farmers, to Rep. Devin Nunes' role in President-elect Donald Trump's transition team, local leaders are in the national headlines. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we are joined by McClatchy Reporter Michael Doyle to talk about water in California and what the new presidential administration means for California water. FM89's Jeffrey Hess reports on the possibility of ICE in Fresno County Jail. Later KVPR's Ezra David Romero reports on the importance of soil when it comes to air quality. We also here about a program to provide WiFi to the community of Lindsay by FM89's Kerry Klein.

Federal Funding Fuels New Valley Fever Research

Dec 11, 2016

For seven years, Dr. George Thompson at the University of California, Davis, collected DNA samples from patients for research into valley fever.

He sought funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the largest funder of primary biomedical research in the U.S., but could not secure any money to pursue his inquiry: Do genes protect some people from getting sick after inhaling the fungus that causes valley fever?

Pages