A new study aims to quantify the social costs of nitrogen fertilizer. San Joaquin Valley residents are likely familiar with nitrates that seep out of agricultural fields and into the water supply. But nitrogen also makes its way into the air and the environment, impacting human health, ecosystems, and the climate. And all those exact costs on society.

Google Street View / Google

EDITORS'S NOTE: As of Monday October 10, 2016 the hot meals program has reopened at a new location.

Original Post: 

The Merced County Rescue Mission is looking for a new home for its hot meals program.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we take a look at how a new land designation for protected frogs in the Sierra Nevada will affect businesses in the region. We also hear from KVPR Reporter Jeffrey Hess about how a disgraced Bakersfield Police Detective was sentenced to five years. Later we are joined by Greg Little with the Mariposa Gazette to chat about the resignation of the superintendent of Yosemite National Park. Ending the program we are joined by Stilian Kirov of the Bakersfield Symphony. 

Hope Hall - Presidential Videographer / White House YouTube

The year 2016 was supposed to be one of celebration at Yosemite National Park, one of the crown jewels of the now century-old National Park Service. But while President Obama did visit the park to celebrate the NPR Centennial this past summer, a new scandal has rocked the park and those who work there. Allegations of a hostile work environment, gender discrimination and sexual harassment led longtime park superintendent Don Neubacher to unexpectedly resign last week.

Tom Clifton / Flickr

In an effort to bump up the number of endangered yellow-legged frogs in the Sequoia and Kings Canyon area the National Park Service has approved a plan to remove nonnative fish from lakes and streams. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.


Nonnative trout were introduced into the Sierra Nevada in the late 1800’s. Danny Boiano is an aquatic biologist in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park.


Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

While the City of Fresno tries to figure out what to do about discolored water at some homes in Northeast Fresno, some residents there are already taking drastic steps, including repiping their homes.

On a normal day, the first thing you notice when you enter the home of Faith and Buzz Nitschke is the dozens of antique clocks quietly ticking away.

But that is not the case on this day.

Ezra David Romero

Late this summer endangered frogs and threatened toads that call the Sierra Nevada home were given 1.8 million acres of protected habitat. That’s a good thing for the amphibians, but as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports private landowners and ranchers aren’t so sure it will help them.  

Yosemite National Park Biologist Rob Grasso and his crew of volunteers are in a hurry. They’re counting tadpoles from a pond and plopping them into five gallon orange coolers. These tadpoles will end up in a lake high up in the backcountry.

Chuck Moses / BSO / Stilian Kirov

It’s fall and that means the Valley’s performing arts organizations are gearing up for their new seasons, including the Bakersfield Symphony Orchestra. Conductor and musical director Stilian Kirov is set to begin his second full season leading the BSO. And what a season it is, with acclaimed guest artists like Eunice Kim and Tomoki Sakata and acclaimed pieces like the Brahms Violin Concerto, Stravisky’s The Firebird and Beethoven’s 9th Symphony.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

A disgraced former Bakersfield Police detective has been sentenced to five years in prison for bribery, drug dealing and other corruption charges.

Damacio Diaz is receiving a sentence much lighter than the state recommended.

Diaz admits to lying on reports, taking bribes from drug dealers and himself moving as much as forty pounds of methamphetamine, among other crimes, during his time as an undercover narcotics officer.

Cal OES YouTube Video / Cal OES

Governor Jerry Brown has signed a bill that will help build out an earthquake early warning system for California. Once it’s up and running, the system will detect the early stages of a quake and transmit a warning to people’s phones and radios. Mark Ghilarducci with the California Office of Emergency Services says it’s a big step.

Ghilarducci: "Technology to be able to sense the time that the energy gets released before the shaking occurs and be able to put that in a warning is very, very significant."